Addressable TV advertising market to hit $3.3B by 2020

FierceVideo | March 26, 2019

Addressable TV advertising market to hit $3.3B by 2020
Overall spending on addressable television advertising is poised for massive growth and could total $3.3 billion by 2020, according to the Video Advertising Bureau.

The VAB just released a marketing guide, Address For Success, and the organization found that 6 out of 10 advertisers using addressable TV say it’s a valuable part of their media buy and are planning to increase their investment. As a result, the VAB believes addressable will grow 343% increase from 2016 to 2020.

There is still lots of potential upside for addressable. The VAB estimates just 40% of U.S. addressable TV agencies and marketing professionals are currently making a significant investment in platforms, and that 71% of these marketers have been buying addressable TV for less than one year.

Spotlight

The following are PricewaterhouseCoopers’ key observations and recommendations from our review of consumer protection in the travel and travel-related services industry, separated according to the three components of the review’s Terms of Reference. For the most part, competitive markets underpinned by generic consumer protection rules, some voluntary accreditation and some private measures provide an adequate and appropriate level of consumer protection in the travel industry.

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Spotlight

The following are PricewaterhouseCoopers’ key observations and recommendations from our review of consumer protection in the travel and travel-related services industry, separated according to the three components of the review’s Terms of Reference. For the most part, competitive markets underpinned by generic consumer protection rules, some voluntary accreditation and some private measures provide an adequate and appropriate level of consumer protection in the travel industry.