Adwerx Moves to Flexible Work Arrangement to the Way Work Has Changed Due to the Coronavirus

Adwerx | October 20, 2020

Adwerx Moves to Flexible Work Arrangement to the Way Work Has Changed Due to the Coronavirus
Adwerx, a leading provider of hyperlocal, personalized, and custom automated advertising services, and honoree on the Inc. 5000 list of America's fastest growing private companies four years in a row, announces that it will provide a flexible work arrangement for employees moving forward. Adwerx employees will be given the option to work from anywhere or come to the home office in Durham on a flexible schedule once the office is re-opened. Beginning operations in 2013, Adwerx was founded with the concept of leveling the playing field for businesses of all sizes through scalable, automated digital advertising. The company's role as a leading technology company was established in 2017 after launching its Advertising Automation Platform, originally designed to serve the needs of the real estate industry through automated ads for new home listings. Building off its tremendous success in real estate, Adwerx set sights on the mortgage, financial services, and franchise verticals. Now just three years later, Adwerx is working with 25% of top brokerage firms and over 15% of the top mortgage originators in the U.S., and has developed a full service, hyperlocal, custom targeted solution that provides brand-locked advertising across social media, streaming TV, and top websites.

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In this course, you'll learn the basics of designing and implementing a successful lead generation campaign on Facebook. This lesson features Facebook Experts Mari Smith, Andrea Vahl, and Dennis Yu, who will teach you what a successful Facebook lead generation campaign looks like, how to target audiences effectively with Facebook ads, how to measure the success of your Facebook ads using cost-per-lead, and how to implement a lead ad on Facebook.

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Facebook | June 19, 2020

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Google | June 03, 2020

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Spotlight

In this course, you'll learn the basics of designing and implementing a successful lead generation campaign on Facebook. This lesson features Facebook Experts Mari Smith, Andrea Vahl, and Dennis Yu, who will teach you what a successful Facebook lead generation campaign looks like, how to target audiences effectively with Facebook ads, how to measure the success of your Facebook ads using cost-per-lead, and how to implement a lead ad on Facebook.