Almost half of Amazon advertisers spend more than $40k per month, study finds

Amazon | January 23, 2019

Almost half of Amazon advertisers spend more than $40k per month, study finds
Fifty-seven percent of brands that sell on Amazon are advertising on the site, and 97% of brands see value in advertising on Amazon, with 69% saying they see a “great deal” of value and more than one-quarter see some value, according to a new report by Feedvisor, titled “Brands & Amazon: Insights, Opportunities, and Concerns in the Age of E-Commerce,” shared with Marketing Dive.  Nearly half of the brands, or 49%, selling on Amazon spend more than $40,000 per month on advertising on the site, and 38% spend more than $60,000 each month. Products in the arts and crafts, sewing, clothing and accessories and beauty categories are spending more than $40,000 per month on Amazon advertising. Brands in the pet supplies category spend more than $100,000 per month, and the toys and games category spends between $60,000 and $80,000.  Most brands, or 74%, are advertising on Amazon to attract new customers, while 59% want to drive brand awareness, 49% are using the platform to generate leads and 45% to drive sales.

Spotlight

2016 is going to bring drastic changes to the world of content marketing by revolutionizing how we consume or publish content. There is a variety of people getting introduced to internet, mostly through mobile phones. The audience is increasingly lacking attention span, which means there is a need to push for visual content and come up with new ways to curate content.

Spotlight

2016 is going to bring drastic changes to the world of content marketing by revolutionizing how we consume or publish content. There is a variety of people getting introduced to internet, mostly through mobile phones. The audience is increasingly lacking attention span, which means there is a need to push for visual content and come up with new ways to curate content.

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