Amplifyer partnered with Mint Measure allowing advertisers to make more efficient media allocations and optimizations

Amplifyer | July 08, 2020

Amplifyer partnered with Mint Measure allowing advertisers to make more efficient media allocations and optimizations
Amplifyer, the company that connects Fortune 1000 advertisers to the most innovative start-ups in the world, announced today that it has partnered with Mint Measure to provide marketers with a better understanding of their media delivery. Serving as a cost-effective alternative to leading multi-touch attribution vendors, Mint Measure provides new-to-market actionable insights, such as Unique Reach (uCPM), to allow advertisers to make more efficient media allocations and optimizations. Additional metrics include: deduplicated reach and frequency, vendor overlap comparison and conversion efficiency index. "I've spent my career as a performance marketer and was frustrated by the lack of optimization tools from ad servers. Multi-touch attribution tools are so expensive, they rarely justified the cost for my clients," said Scott Konopasek, Mint Measure's CEO and Founder. "I am excited to be partnering with Amplifyer to bring Mint Measure to the brands that could really benefit from a cost-effective and deterministic measurement tool." An ad agency veteran, Konopasek has managed the digital campaigns of leading companies like Slack and Bumble with a proven record of developing and implementing ROI-driven media strategies.

Spotlight

: As a form of brand personification, this article analyses the presence of the figure of the spokesperson in its various forms and their use in radio advertising. Methods: Quantitative content analysis has been performed on the advertising spots broadcast by the 12 national commercial radio stations with the highest audience shares in Spain (of which three are full-service and nine are themed stations). The sample of adverts featuring spokespeople was composed by 3,890 units. The type of spokesperson has been correlated with other variables such as the type of advertiser, product category, type of message and subject pronoun. Results and conclusions: Radio, as a medium, is more inclined to make use of voices representing low-profile personalities to the detriment of celebrities who are featured in advertising in other media.

Spotlight

: As a form of brand personification, this article analyses the presence of the figure of the spokesperson in its various forms and their use in radio advertising. Methods: Quantitative content analysis has been performed on the advertising spots broadcast by the 12 national commercial radio stations with the highest audience shares in Spain (of which three are full-service and nine are themed stations). The sample of adverts featuring spokespeople was composed by 3,890 units. The type of spokesperson has been correlated with other variables such as the type of advertiser, product category, type of message and subject pronoun. Results and conclusions: Radio, as a medium, is more inclined to make use of voices representing low-profile personalities to the detriment of celebrities who are featured in advertising in other media.

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