Bloomberg campaign brings on former Facebook and Foursquare executives to run digital ads

theverge | December 23, 2019

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg has been quietly assembling a squad of tech executives to run digital advertising for his presidential campaign, as uncovered in a new report by CNBC. The report centers on a firm called Hawkfish, a digital ad startup that’s currently embedded within the Bloomberg campaign. According to the campaign, Hawkfish was founded earlier this year, hiring Facebook’s former chief marketing officer Gary Briggs as one of the first employees. Former Foursquare CEO Jeff Glueck joined earlier this month, as reported by CNBC. The firm was active in 2019 races in both Virginia and Kentucky, operating as a general Bloomberg-aligned ad firm meant to counteract a perceived Republican advantage in digital ad targeting.

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Are you on the fence about getting started on social media marketing for your business? In this video we talk about what how to make the transition smoothly.

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Are you on the fence about getting started on social media marketing for your business? In this video we talk about what how to make the transition smoothly.

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New Research Explores How DTC Ecommerce Brands Measure Performance and Optimize Ad Spend

Measured | July 27, 2022

Measured, the leading spend optimization platform for DTC advertisers, today released The State Of DTC Marketing Measurement, a new research report that explores how direct to consumer (DTC) marketers are navigating budget optimization and measurement challenges associated with ongoing upheaval in the advertising industry. Based on a recent survey of DTC marketers, conducted by media metrics consultancy Sequent Partners, the report reveals where marketers are allocating their ad spend, how they collect and manage data for performance reporting, and what tools and technology they are using to connect media investments to business results. “New privacy rules restricting user-level tracking and shortening attribution lookback windows have had a significant impact on measurement systems and capabilities for media platforms and attribution vendors,” said Alice Sylvester, Partner at Sequent Partners. “These challenges, added to rapid shifts in consumer behavior caused by unpredictable global events, have kept marketers in reactive mode for the past few years. This research captures the current mindset of DTC marketers and evaluates how they are preparing for an unpredictable future.” Survey responses were collected from 300+ DTC marketers, director level and above. Some of key findings include: The greatest challenge for DTC marketers is accessing and synthesizing accurate data from disparate sources. 64% of DTC marketers spend over nine hours per week on reporting activities, with some roles spending upwards of 25 hours per week compiling performance reports. Despite reported inaccuracies, more than 80% of DTC marketers still rely on click-based data as their primary source of media measurement. Marketers overwhelmingly agree experiments and testing significantly improve their decision-making confidence. Last touch is hard to quit Despite the well-documented inaccuracies of last-click attribution, most DTC marketers are still using data from platform reporting as their primary form of measurement. 69% of marketers indicate data accuracy as a main concern, yet 81% are confident in their ability to tie media spend to business results. Findings indicate brands are either performing additional analytics, like incrementality experiments, to get a clearer picture, or they’re hazardously taking platform data at face value. Experiments lead to confident decision-making The methods least used currently by marketers as their primary form of measurement are incrementality experiments (4.7%) and multi-touch attribution (MTA), at 2.5%. As privacy-related challenges continue to erode the validity and popularity of MTA, marketers are increasing investments in tools and technology for in-market testing and experimentation, which can be executed without tracking users. 80.2% of respondents say testing and experiments make them more confident about media decisions. Data is more abundant, but still unmanageable With data management issues topping the list of challenges faced by DTC marketers, it is unsurprising that reporting efforts take up so much of their time. In contrast, the vast majority of marketers (82.4%) state that they have a single source of truth for marketing data. The contradiction suggests these systems are still inadequate for normalizing data from disparate sources and providing fast and reliable access to cross-channel insights. “While the landscape has changed a lot and the past few years have been turbulent for so many reasons, what marketers want has remained consistent. They need to know where to put the next dollar for the best possible results - and they need to trust where they’re getting the answers,” said Trevor Testwuide, CEO and co-founder of Measured. “For brands, this research confirms that they are not alone in the seemingly endless pursuit of reliable insights. For Measured, it confirms where we need to focus our energy to provide the most value for our clients and guide them to a successful future.” About Measured Measured is an advertising spend optimization platform built to help DTC brands make smart media investment decisions. With the only proven approach that can demonstrate the true incremental business contribution of each ad dollar spent, Measured provides reliable ongoing insights, regardless of industry changes in ID tracking and data privacy policies. Measured incrementality experiments are expertly designed for every marketing channel and are powered by a marketing data warehouse (MDW) that is custom built for each individual brand. Since 2017, brands like Crocs, Parachute, Rothys, Ruggable, and Vuori have relied on incrementality insights from Measured to maximize media performance and drive business growth. For more information, visit measured.com.

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Amazon to Share Cashierless Store Data with Brands and Advertisers

Amazon | June 30, 2022

Amazon.com Inc. developed cashierless technology to expedite trips to the grocery store or convenience store. It now wants to use the tracking system to assist brands and advertisers in determining how to sell more products. The company announced plans to share data from its shopper-tracking cameras and sensors in a blog post on Wednesday. Among other things, Amazon would tell brands how many people bought an item pulled from a shelf, how many returned it, and how many bought it later on Amazon.com. The Store Analytics initiative essentially extends the data-mining capabilities of e-commerce to physical stores. Amazon's "Just Walk Out" technology, which was launched in 2018 after years of internal development, is now available in more than 50 Amazon retail locations, including Amazon Go convenience stores and Amazon Fresh grocery stores. The network of overhead cameras and shelf sensors automatically registers and bills shoppers as they exit. If brands find the data useful, Amazon may be able to recoup the enormous costs associated with developing and operating the technology. People working on the project and at competing companies developing cashierless systems have long speculated that data on what items customers consider and how they navigate stores could be profitable. But, according to retail analysts, cashierless shopping is a technological marvel but not yet a commercial success. Brands will have access to details on how their products are discovered, considered, and purchased in applicable stores to help them inform decisions related to selection, promotions, and ad campaigns, according to the blog. The program may resurrect privacy concerns about Amazon's cashierless system. The company stated in the post and accompanying explainer that individual shopper data would not be shared and used the phrase "aggregated and anonymized" ten times. According to Amazon, video and images of shoppers will not be sent to brands, and individual shoppers can opt-out of having their data included in Store Analytics.

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Dentsu Launches Contextual Targeting Tool

Dentsu | June 09, 2022

Dentsu is launching a new Contextual Intelligence tool across its U.S. media agencies. Contextual targeting has gained relevance as Apple and Google take moves to limit web monitoring. Contextual Intelligence uses unique algorithms to link brand targets with content across Carat, Dentsu X, and iProspect. Five clients have already utilized the tool. Dentsu reports that the return on investment for one company, the luxury jewelry store Pandora, was 24 times larger than any other Valentine's Day test advertising technique. Katie Nevin, Pandora's paid social and programmatic coordinator, referred to Contextual Intelligence as "a competitive advantage as we strive to earn increasingly limited attention in the market." Akash Jairath, chief product officer of Dentsu Media, U.S., said, "The tool starts by assigning content labels to URLs based on users inputting keywords, phrases and other URLs they've identified as relevant to their customers. The Competitive Intelligence tool fine-tunes those targets and pushes a list target URLs to demand-side platforms for programmatic buys." Akash Jairath, chief product officer of Dentsu Media, U.S., said, "The tool starts by assigning content labels to URLs based on users inputting keywords, phrases and other URLs they've identified as relevant to their customers. The Competitive Intelligence tool fine-tunes those targets and pushes a list target URLs to demand-side platforms for programmatic buys." Jairath further stated, "Given the impending loss of cookies in Chrome and restrictions on targeting in the Apple ecosystem, contextual targeting is definitely getting more interest from clients." Much of this sophistication and data science is contextual, so it has become a more precise instrument than a crude one. Yet another advantage of contextual targeting is when it misses the mark, maybe not reaching a known client or past website visitor, but instead reaching those with similar interests who may become new customers for a company. Akash Jairath, chief product officer of Dentsu Media, U.S., said, "It started out with people thinking of it as waste, but it's really a halo effect. That's thought to work well for branding, but even from a performance standpoint, it certainly has a halo effect."

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