Chrome to block resource-intensive ads by default in future release

Chrome | July 04, 2019

Chrome to block resource-intensive ads by default in future release
A necessary evil though they may be to support our "free" web services, ads are kind of the worst. Even Google, a company whose very existence is predicated on ad revenue, seems aware of this: after blocking intrusive ads in Chrome, a new Chromium commit shows the company is intent on banishing resource-intensive ads, too. The in-development feature is called "Heavy Ad Intervention." Currently, the plan is to block ads that use more than four megabytes of bandwidth or take up CPU resources for 60 seconds or more — that's about a tenth of one percent of all ads, according to the commit. When an ad is in violation, a simple notice will be shown saying that it was removed, with a "Details" link explaining it used too many resources. The criteria for offending ads "may be changed as more data is available," though. Lest you think Google is being uncharacteristically charitable in its automatic blocking of the crappiest ads the web has to offer, remember that the company has been weighing its options when it comes to how it allows third-party ad blockers to operate within Chrome.

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YouTube Accelerates its TV-screen Ad Alternatives

YouTube | May 11, 2020

YouTube is accelerating its TV-screen ad options. Google’s internal numbers that show sharp growth in consumption on TVs, and there’s been speculation these numbers will remain consistent as COVID-19 keeps consumers at home. The ad formats may be familiar to regular advertisers on YouTube, but the move signals Google’s intention to continue its growth in the realm of connected TV instead of just an app on user phones. Brand Lift on TV Screens Advertisers running Brand Lift surveys on YouTube will have a new placement in the coming months: TV screens. With media mixes becoming increasingly reliant on streaming, it’s more important than ever to measure its impact. As a result, we’re accelerating the launch of Brand Lift for YouTube on TV screens. - Google announcement Surveys will be optimized for larger screens and be TV remote control-enabled so users can participate instead of tapping or with a mouse on their desktop. Google touts the ability for brands to now make faster decisions about their ad performance on the fly with the additional data. It will be available for ad recall, purchase intent, or awareness studies for the YouTube app on TVs in the coming weeks. The projected date for YouTube TV is early in the third quarter. Skippable Ad Format Coming to TV YouTube’s widely-used skippable ad format will also be available on TV screens this year. Skippable ads appear before, during or after other YouTube videos. They run for 5 seconds before the user has the option to skip them. Advertisers find these favorable because they only pay if the user watches the whole video, or 30 seconds of it, whichever happens first. Skippable ad prices are paid based on impressions, with the option for bidding types like Target CPM, Target CPA and Maximize Conversions. Read more: Youtube launched a free DIY tool for small businesses to create short video ads Timing of the Enhancements Google reports sharp year-over-year increases of watch time by 80% on YouTube in the US. The data cited runs from March 11-April 10, so the jump doesn’t fully encompass the anticipated surge that will eventually be reported from the time period during the COVID-19 outbreak. From this time period int he US, Google has seen: -250% increase in feature-length movies -300% increase in TV show consumption -450% increase in news Worldwide, Google is reporting: -800% increase in feature-length movies -125% increase in TV Shows -250% increase in live content YouTube During COVID-19 Comscore has reported that over 70 million US households stream content to their TV screens. Of this consumption, the report shows that YouTube has the highest reach and most hours consumed among any streaming service. YouTube accounts for 25% of all streaming watch time in the US. The weeks of sheltering in place has meant a more captive audience, often with multiple family members who stream together or alone. The rapid increase has created a wave of demand for fresh content from the platform. Google has also noted that watch time via screencasting has increased 75% year over year. Their full announcement can be read here. OTT/CTV Wars Heating Up This increase in demand has not come without challenges for creators trying to monetize short-term. Fluctuating policies around COVID-related content and advertiser hesitancy to have their ads appear in tandem with it are expected to wane as users’ experience during this time normalize. eMarketer reported a huge 320% leap at the start of the year for Connected TV ad transactions in North America. Streaming devices and programmatic services like The Trade Desk are all better on the continued growth. Just this week, Roku announced their OneView Platform launch, signaling their intention to get a piece of the ad spend pie, particularly in light of the sustained rate of larger consumption during Coronavirus. Our goal is to help advertisers and content partners invest for a world where all TV is streamed. - Scott Rosenberg, SVP and GM, Platform Business at Roku Read more: Youtube mulls letting creators sell their own ads directly to brands

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Crystalead Announces Short-Term Campaigning Programs, Tailored for Holiday Season

Crystalead | January 04, 2021

In anticipation of the 2020 holiday season, digital marketing firm Crystalead has reported it is putting an accentuation on shorter-term campaigning plans, intended for more quick income. This is an aftereffect of a rising interest for this sort of movement among new clients, just as an agreement that this holiday season will be not the same as others. At the base of lead generation lies the agreement that in the present reality, online advertisements are adequately not to bring a deal to a close. Publicists need to consider new ideas to sell and to expand the quantity of bring clients back. That is the reason they should zero in on drawing in with likely purchasers to pick up contact subtleties from them. At that stage, 'offline' marketers come into play and do their magic via phone calls or direct meetings. In Crystalead's foundation and with an underlying spending plan, online campaigners can make and distribute crusades utilizing a basic, 3-step funnel. The outcomes comes as commissions for each lead created and submitted to the publicizing industry. Presently campaigners can design their missions in a way which can assist them with performing help cover uses having to do with the Christmas season, for example, gift shopping, vacation planning and so on.

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Facebook Relaxes Restrictions About Ads On Non-Medical Masks and Coronavirus

Facebook | June 12, 2020

Facebook Ads is walking back a portion of the rule that bans the sale of face masks, driven by increased demand and state guidelines on mask-wearing. Facebook announced they are relaxing the restrictions around ads selling face masks, a rule they instituted in March. The rule originally came into effect as Covid-19 was spreading, and a mask shortage was imminent. In order to prevent price gouging, hoarding, and spread of misinformation, Facebook made the decision to unilaterally ban any ads selling masks. Phased Openings Driving Demand As states have started re-opening, many have created new rules and guidelines for being in public. One of those guidelines is wearing face masks to help prevent continued spread, with non-medical ones being acceptable. This has driven demand among consumers looking to purchase reusable masks online, and causing less issue of medical ones being sought out. Medical vs. Non-Medical Masks Facebook has specified the ban on ads is being lifted for non-medical masks. They define non-medical masks as the following: - non-medical grade - masks not promoted with medical or health claims - handmade or fabric masks - reusable masks - refashioned materials (notably things from clothing retailers who have started producing, like neoprene, etc) Advertiser Restrictions for Selling Non-Medical Masks Facebook has also noted that this ban lift will not apply to every advertiser who suddenly wants to get in the game and sell masks. They have outlined requirements around advertisers who are allowed to run these ads. To prevent unknown entities from suddenly piling in and potentially scamming buyers, advertisers must meet some criteria. The first is they must currently be in good standing with Facebook Ads, meaning no violations or disabled instances due to policy violation. Advertisers must also have a minimum advertising history of at least 4 months, or be associated with a Business Manager of that age. The 4-month requirement is tied to the date advertising started – not the date the account was created. Read more: Facebook highlights digital air strike’s click to marketplace advertising helping increase consumer sales during COVID-19 For example, if a Page was created a year ago, but it never ran ads, it would not be eligible. Ad accounts tied to a Business Manager that has run ads in the past 4 months will be allowed. Geography Targeting Restrictions Some countries had unusually high policy violations for attempting to sell medical equipment during the ban. For advertisers that reside in that country and meet the criteria above, they will only be permitted to run the mask-selling ads in their home country. - These countries include: - Cameroon - China - Indonesia - Israel - Kazakhstan - Malaysia - Thailand - Turkey - Ukraine - Vietnam Facebook notes these restrictions are temporary. Prohibited Content Tied to Mask Ads There are also rules around the content within the ad and the landing page that ads take a user to. There can be no medical or health claims made. This includes mentions of disease prevention, protection of the respiratory system, or ability to filter out germs. If an advertiser wants to mention the community benefits of wearing masks, the ad and landing page cannot do so while tying it to the benefits noted above. It also cannot overstate claims about the benefits of masks. They give the following example on the difference in language for this rule: We’ve pivoted our business to making masks to help keep our community healthy’ would be allowed, but stating ‘We’re stopping the spread of COVID-19 by making masks’ would not be allowed . - Facebook policy Restrictions are still in place for hand sanitizers, surface wipes, Covid-19 test kits, medical grade face masks. None of these may be used as a free gift with purchases, either. The full policy on this change can be found here.

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That's why infographics are so popular.And it's why I've spent the last couple days searching the internets far & wide to find the 16 most awesome Facebook marketing infographics ever.These will show you just how effectively infographics can be used to present stories & info to your audience.